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No Barriers Podcast Episode 127: Accessible Design with Faith Malton



Erik and Dave speak with self-named, One Arm Wonder, Faith Malton. Faith helps others break through mental barriers and navigate the world with limb differences via her social media and her day job at a civil engineering firm. Faith Malton is a natural-born engineer. She was born missing her right arm and thus, grew up problem-solving and adapting to her environment through innovation

More importantly, she engineered her mental aptitude and psyche to be rooted in a growth mindset.  A student ambassador, she found herself inquisitive on how other cultures worked and how culture determines the perception of disability. Her curiosity led her to places like Antarctica, India, and Tanzania. Every trip was an awakening and revealed to her how the built environment shapes the way in which humans experience the world.

She now works at Walter P. Moore, an international civil engineering firm, doing site design. She believes design teams have a responsibility for their designs to be universally accessible, inspire the human spirit, and nurture a connection to the natural world.

Malton also works to help others break through mental barriers and navigate the world with limb differences through her YouTube channel, One Arm Wonder.

Resources:

YouTube: One Arm Wonder

Instagram: @theonearmwonderrr

TEDx Talk:  From Victim to Creator

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Episode Transcript

Faith Malton:
Pity dehumanizes us as humans. And I often had a lot of pity projected towards me as a kid, and so I hated having to ask a stranger, Hey, can you tie my shoes? But at the same time, it also made me practice having courage in my life every single day. I didn't realize that at the time, but I was creating this sort of energy around myself. That fear, that anxiety of feeling weak or vulnerable actually helped me create an aura around me.

Erik Weihenmayer:
It's easy to talk about the successes, but what doesn't get talked about enough is the struggle. My name is Erik Weihenmayer. I've gotten the chance to ascend Mount Everest, to climb the tallest mountain in every continent, to kayak the Grand Canyon, and I happen to be blind. It's been a struggle to live what I call a no barriers life, to define it, to push the parameters of what it means. And part of the equation is diving into the learning process and trying to illuminate the universal elements that exist along the way, and that unexplored terrain between those dark places we find ourselves in and the summit, exists a map. That map, that way forward, is what we call no barriers.

Speaker 3:
Faith Malton is a natural born engineer. She was born missing her right arm and grew up problem solving and adapting to her environment through innovation. More importantly, she engineered her mental aptitude in psyche to be rooted in a growth mindset. She recently graduated cum laude from University of Houston with a Bachelor's of Science Degree in Civil Engineering, in the minor, in energy and sustainability. She now works at Walter P Moore, an international civil engineering firm, doing site design. Faith believes design teams have a responsibility for their designs to be universally accessible, to inspire the human spirit and nurture connection to the natural world. She also helps others break through mental barriers and navigate the world with limb difference through her YouTube channel, OneArmWonder. Enjoy this conversation with Faith Malton.

Dave:
Well, I'm really excited, everyone. Welcome to The No Barriers Podcast. We are going to be talking with Faith Malton today, and she's got an incredible story as you heard in the intro piece there. Erik, welcome back from Scotland. It's good to have you back.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Thanks Dave. It is good. I'm a little jet lagged, but I'm feeling good.

Dave:
And Faith, welcome to the show.

Faith Malton:
Thank you so much for having me. It's a pleasure to be here.

Dave:
Now, Erik, got to start. I just threw out you were in Scotland and I know we're going to talk to Faith about her story, but what were you doing in Scotland?

Erik Weihenmayer:
Well, I dropped my son off at University of Vermont and so I thought I'd treat myself to a little adventure. So I went with my buddy to Scotland. The first week we biked across Scotland from east to west. And then the second week we climbed these sea stacks, these really cool sandstone towers that rise up right out of the North Atlantic Ocean. They're right off the coast of Scotland, and you have to swim to some of them, so wild. Tammy O'Neil, my partner, swam through these crazy seas and set up the Tyrolean traverses, and then you come sliding across the rope and then we climb the tower and then we Tyrolean back. So, they're really cool where you involve ocean and climbing. Faith, are you in, next adventure?

Faith Malton:
I'm in, I'm in. That sounds phenomenal, sounds so cool.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Yeah. Your YouTube channel is amazing, I've been watching it. I'm like hooked completely.

Faith Malton:
Oh my goodness.

Erik Weihenmayer:
You're giving all these tips about how to put on jeans and how to do a hair tie, how to wash your hand. I like it get how you said hands then you went hand.

Faith Malton:
I forget sometimes.

Erik Weihenmayer:
So yeah, we'd have to figure out how to Tyrolean traverse with one arm just cranking across the ocean. That would be cool. I think we could do it though.

Faith Malton:
I think so. I've seen actually a guy do it on Instagram before, who has one arm.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). So tell us all about... This is so cool. So you give these show and tells on how to do stuff. So you have all these secrets that you've learned. So do you think being an arm amputee sort of forces you to become an engineer or a problem solver? And what have you learned, what are the secrets?

Faith Malton:
Yeah, absolutely. I'm a natural born engineer, so that's the term that's being used to describe me is that having one arm, you are forced to problem solve every minute of your day. Especially as a kid, as a kid I wasn't put into any sort of therapy or I didn't have a mentor or a teacher or anything. My parents treated me like any other kid, and if I ever tried to play the one arm card they would say, that's a fact and not an excuse, and they always would say make it work, figure it out. Even if they had to just watch me struggle, they would just watch me struggle, which I think was incredibly powerful. I don't think I can accurately describe it, but as far as implementing a victor mindset, that was really influential. So that's one of the reasons why I created the YouTube channel, it was because I wish that I had somebody to sort of teach me how to do the one arm life as a kid, and I wanted to go ahead and pay that forward.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Talk us through a couple of the show and tells.

Faith Malton:
One of my favorite show and tells that I created was how to tie your shoe. I did not learn how to tie my shoe until I was in seventh grade. And I used to have a lot of fear around getting older and growing up because I was afraid that I would be in my forties and still living with my mother because I couldn't do things by myself. So learning how to tie my shoe was incredibly empowering because it was evidence for me to be like, wow, I can navigate the world on my own. And I actually used... SpongeBob SquarePants taught me how to tie my shoes, because he has this whole episode where he sings, how to tie your shoes. I would sing that song in my head and I would sit there with the shoelaces and do it over and over and over again and figure out ways of, how can I manipulate my fingers to really studying the elements of shoe tying like, where do you need to apply a force? What goes under where? And breaking it down bit by bit. And that's sort of where the engineering mindset comes into place.

Faith Malton:
Even just today, I was coming into my home and I had my phone, my house keys and my purse all in my hand, and my door's really heavy. And so I'm having to anticipate how doors are going to move, how my hand has to twist in order to open up the door. I have to anticipate things two or three steps ahead and it was my intention and my videos to articulate that in some way to help people also like, okay, you have to think about things, not just as you're doing them, but also three steps as you're doing them as well.

Erik Weihenmayer:
And what about washing your hand? That was a cool one.

Faith Malton:
It's funny that you really enjoyed that one because I was a bit... I didn't think, I-

Erik Weihenmayer:
I loved that, it was so interesting.

Faith Malton:
I picked that one because I was running out of ideas.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Well, it was good though, because I was relating. Because when I pour a cup of juice or something, I do something which might be perceived as being gross, but it's like, I don't know how else to do it, I was a blind guy. I put my finger down. I can do it by weight sometimes, I pour it in, I can tell by the weight, but that's a little bit suspect. So I stick my finger in and I wait for the juice or whatever to touch my finger. And if I'm pouring somebody else's glass, I'm really careful about that. But I remember you were like, "Hey, if it's a clean sink, this is how I do it."

Faith Malton:
Yep. Yep. So I wash my hand with one hand, is I will put soap on the side of a clean sink and kind of like a pig rolls in mud, I roll my hand in that soap and to get my hand all around the soap and then I wash it off. But if I'm in the shower, I have one of those sticks with a scrubber on it, and I'll put that stick in between my knees and scrub my hand with a brush. So I'm in all kinds of interesting positions in the shower, just to say.

Erik Weihenmayer:
And it is true, it's so interesting because every little bit of your life, you have to figure out, it's sink or swim, right?

Faith Malton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Erik Weihenmayer:
And so tying your shoes, you must have been like, I'm assuming, tell me if I'm wrong, you were thinking, oh God, there must be fear around this because if I can't tie my shoe, I have to get somebody else to tie my shoe for me, and that's embarrassing, or...

Faith Malton:
Exactly.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Or how did you feel about it?

Faith Malton:
You hit it, you hit it right on the head. I had this-

Erik Weihenmayer:
There's anxiety that builds up around these things.

Faith Malton:
Yeah. We were talking before the show started about how our bodies store trauma and I'm just now unpacking how much of it an anxious state I lived in as a kid for fear of not being independent or having to ask a stranger for help. Because the worst thing I think, one of the worst things a human being can do to another human being is pity a human being. Pity dehumanizes us as humans. And I often had a lot of pity projected towards me as a kid. And so, I had this mantra that I would say, it was, help is for the week, which had its consequences later on the line. But that was one of the reasons why I was so adamant, going ahead to tie my shoes is because I hated having to ask a stranger, Hey, can you tie my shoes?

Faith Malton:
But at the same time, it also made me practice having courage in my life every single day into... If I was going to ask for help, I wasn't going to do it all subconscious. If I was going to ask for help, I was going to act like you helping me was the very best thing that could happen to your entire life, like it was an honor to help me. I didn't realize that at the time, but I was creating this sort of energy around myself. That fear, that anxiety of feeling weak or vulnerable actually helped me create an aura around me.

Dave:
Faith, I'm really curious. As you were growing up, I'm always struck by the gap between sort of like someone who might look at you because you have an obvious visible disability, and they make assumptions about what your struggles are, and the gap between what their assumptions are and the reality of what you're really struggling with as a kid can often be quite different and as adult. And so I'm just curious, as a kid, what were those things that you really were kind of most worried about as it pertained to your disability?

Faith Malton:
Yeah, it's super interesting. I've had people come up to me and say, oh, poor thing, or your life must be so hard. It was one of the biggest teachers about humanity and human beings and the mind and people sometimes live in a very small world. But as a kid, I was afraid of not being able to tie my shoes by myself, so I always had to live with my mother. And then being female, I was afraid of how am I going to put on a bra, and also as a female, I was concerned about relating to the males and how that experience would go as I got older. It's interesting what time can do for you and how sometimes we think that we need to have an answer or something figured out in a moment and time actually teaches you or gives you the solution.

Dave:
And in terms of your kind of early influences, and helping you become this independent minded, creative spirit who then went on to be an engineer, talk a little bit about how you think you developed this mentality and how much of it you were just kind of born with and how much it was instilled upon you by your mentors.

Faith Malton:
I think my essence is very creative and I love to learn, I'm obsessed with learning. And then my experience having one arm, having to be able to dissect how things worked as far as physics, like when I push here this moves, and being able to manipulate material and anticipate how material will be influenced by my manipulation of it. And then my parents both very much a survivor mentality. So that instilled a strength within me to persevere through resistance, persevere through challenge, and always have a plan B or always have a... Never give essentially. And that was really big in my ability to problem solve. I went into civil engineering because I wanted to design sustainable cities using biomimicry as the template for design. And I think that going through engineering school, I noticed how... I didn't realize it when I picked engineering but going through the program, I realized how much of a natural fit it was that I've been problem solving my whole life, and here I am doing math. I'm problem solving in a new way.

Dave:
What is biomimicry?

Faith Malton:
It is a philosophy of design. It's looking to nature for solutions, looking to nature for engineering systems. A classic example of biomimicry is studying a bird to learn how to optimize flight. I had the idea of, well, what if we looked at the systems and biomes and... Looking at a rainforest for example, and breaking it down into systems and taking those systems and replicating them into society. Because if you look at a rainforest, it's an incredibly efficient system, you have decomposers, you have producers, it is a closed loop system where there is no waste. And every niche creates opportunity. Every animal, every plant, creates opportunity for other animals and other plants. So how can we replicate that into our societies and particularly the built environment which is the very foundation of our societies.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Very cool connection.

Dave:
Faith, when did you develop this passion from a career perspective?

Faith Malton:
In terms of biomimicry or in terms of the built environment?

Dave:
Both.

Dave:
Both.

Faith Malton:
Yeah. Has this been something you've been aspiring to since a young age, is this and that kind of came as you went through your university training?

Faith Malton:
My relationship with the natural world had been with me from a very young age, and having reverence for nature and an interest in how does it work and looking at the design. I mean, you look at the design of, for example a flower, looking at the geometric patterns, and I've always was fascinated with how nature worked. And then traveling around the world and looking at how the built environment influences culture and vice versa was really fascinating to me. And then also learning about how the natural world influences the built environment. I was very lucky to start traveling around the world very young. My first trip was when I was going into sixth grade and I traveled with student ambassador programs. So I wasn't with my parents, I was with a bunch of kids I never knew, sent to learn about culture or sustainability or climate change. And by the time I had turned 18, I'd been to all seven continents doing student ambassador programs.

Dave:
Amazing.

Erik Weihenmayer:
And so explain a little bit more about that, how our identities and the way we see the world, the way we understand the world is affected by our environment. Because it sounds like those travel experiences were a big awakening for you in terms of understanding even how people perceive disability around the world.

Faith Malton:
Yep, exactly. Every trip was an awakening of sorts. For example, in India, it is a curse system, and to be born with a disability really puts you at a huge disadvantage as far as opportunity and also mobility. The way that the streets and the public service, as far as accessibility goes, there is no ADA. So, if you're in a wheelchair and in India, you are dramatically more confined to your home or to wherever you're living because they don't even have accessibility regulations or rules. And so here in the United States, it was always interesting traveling and coming back and realizing how lucky I am to have a disability in the United States, and how lucky I am to have an upper limb disability in the world. Yeah, it's really interesting. Also some cultures, disability is very much a taboo or there's a curse, there's beliefs that there's some sort of curse around somebody who has a disability. So it was interesting showing up in these different cultures and seeing how they perceived me. Seeing their reaction was interesting.

Erik Weihenmayer:
You talk a lot about being othered a lot in your life. Explain to people what being othered, that's a pretty interesting phrase.

Faith Malton:
It happens with body language. It happens with engagement. It happens with attention and it happens with energy. These four things create the impact that somebody feels othered. And it's basically just a lack of acknowledgement of one's own existence. I've been in situations where I'm in a group of girls, like me and my girlfriends and we're meeting a new group of people, specifically guys, and I'm making a middle school, where they'll introduce each other, and then when it comes to me, people get awkward, their energy shifts to being uncomfortable, they get kind of timid, a wall goes up and they might shake my hand, they might totally skip me. And then for the rest of the conversation, as we're in this little circle, they never look me in the eye, their direction, they never face their body towards me again. You know how whenever you're in a group, it's important to look at everybody as you speak, so everybody feels included. That was rarely ever the case for me.

Faith Malton:
And that's how you make somebody feel othered, it's when you energetically leave them out or when you dismiss them with your body language or with your energy, or when you judge them in your mind. I mean, we are energetic beings. We can feel when somebody is not clicking with us. So that creates the sensation of being othered. Much of the state of consciousness of humanity is still in a very tribal fight or flight energy or frequency of consciousness. And so whenever we operate in that tribal mentality, that's how we... People who look like us, we want to go talk to, people who don't look like us, we avoid, even though at the end of the day, we all feel the same things, we all want the same things. These are just our spaceships, these are just the meat suits that we're in. Who we are, we are the light behind our eyes. And so that's how I would describe the othered component.

Erik Weihenmayer:
How did you work your way through that? Because it's so easy, and I've heard you talk about this, to just go, oh God, the way they look at me, it doesn't feel good. And then that creates a story in your own mind of saying, maybe I'm unworthy or I'm not as good as other people, and it makes you retreat into the corner. But for you, clearly it didn't do that. So how did you work through that process of maturing and kind of expanding your consciousness?

Faith Malton:
It did for a while, I'm still unpacking stories for sure. However, understanding that people know not what they do, and that people, human beings, we are programmed, zero to seven, the brains in a certain brainwave state where it's absorbing. Like kids are a sponge because they're in, I think it's theta, theta brainwave state, where you're just in almost like a hypnosis, that's why kids pick up things so quickly. And so understanding that people are products of their lives, their circumstances, their parents, their cultural and familial programming, people are just products of that. And oftentimes we go through life and we don't debug ourselves from programs that aren't actually as serving us or that are divisive in nature.

Faith Malton:
So having a lot of compassion is how I got through it. And I'm also very lucky that I have a mom who taught me the underbelly of humanity and taught me the shadow aspects of human nature, and always talked to me as an adult. Even when I was a little kid, she would just tell me like it was and would tell me things that were hard to hear, but she always kept it real. And so that was really helpful as well.

Erik Weihenmayer:
I think that's really cool. So I want to just pause on that a second. So somebody, you're in that group and they don't look at you in the eye, they kind of look away or whatever. So in your mind you have a story, but what I hear, the compassion for that person, maybe their story is, I've never met somebody with a disability, I'm scared as hell right now, I don't know what to say, I don't... You're right. So is that part of it? Just expanding your compassion to how people are perceiving you and what their challenges might have been in their past?

Faith Malton:
Exactly. I'd often, in an interaction, I would have tears in my eyes because I think that it's about me. And then I just have this voice in my head that says, it's not about you, it's not about you. And so keeping that understanding of, I think it's so important to understand how human beings are as animals, first and foremost. We think that people's responses or interactions with us are about us, and 90% of the time it's totally about them. We are reacting with our own trauma and our own baggage and our own triggers.

Faith Malton:
Especially working with people who are young or interacting with people who haven't had life experiences. I'm very aware that when people meet me, it might be their first time meeting somebody with one arm. And unfortunately, also in pop culture, people who are limb different are not cast in empowering positions in media and pop culture. So then when somebody sees somebody like me, they have that program, because media is a program, that's why it's called a television program. They have that vision of me of saying, oh, she's going to be self-conscious or she's going to be this way and this way. And so when somebody has that energy towards me, I just have compassion of, they're just reacting to me as they've been taught to. And so it's my responsibility to change that narrative.

Erik Weihenmayer:
I don't want to bring it back to me, but I'm kind to do that anyway.

Faith Malton:
Please, please.

Erik Weihenmayer:
That's what somebody says, "I don't want to do that," and then they're going to do it. So I'm climbing those sea stacks in Scotland, and I just climbed the tallest sea stack in Scotland, and I'm hiking back to town, and this lady passes us and she says, "Oh, you're blind." Somehow she found out I was blind, and she said, "Oh God, I'm so sorry for you. I'm a Christian and you'll be rewarded in heaven. You'll be able to see again," and patted me on the shoulder. And it did, it changed the energy. It made me just go, oh, that doesn't feel right, that she's like... And her intentions weren't like bad. I don't think she was a bad person, she was trying to be positive in her own lens. But still, it definitely changed the energy and I went, ah, it doesn't quite feel right. She's saying like my life on earth is not all it should be. How do you interpret that?

Faith Malton:
Every single human being, at a fundamental level wants to be seen, wants to be heard and wants to be loved, those three things. So to pity someone is to not see someone, it is to not hear someone and it is to not love someone. And I think that that is why it is so incredibly gutting to be pitied, it is because it pulls the rug out from the three core things that every single human being wants.

Erik Weihenmayer:
So it's back to being othered. And so back to that basic experience, you tell a story sometimes about, as a middle school girl going on a dance, and how that created some trauma that you had to work your way through, can you talk about that? That was pretty interesting.

Faith Malton:
Yeah. So when I was in middle school, I went to an all girls school. The school that I went to, there was a bunch of different schools that they all kind of worked together as far as bringing their students together. And one of the things that they would do is this event called dance club. It would happen in the spring where, I believe it was once a week or twice a week something like that, all the kids at these different schools would get together and they'd be put into this ballroom and learn traditional dances like the foxtrot and salsa.

Erik Weihenmayer:
By the way, Faith, every human I know that went to that kind of thing has a traumatic experience. [crosstalk 00:26:32].

Faith Malton:
No way.

Dave:
Yeah, it's a horrible experience.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Mine too.

Dave:
Oh my God, so bad.

Erik Weihenmayer:
I still remember it. Anyway, continue.

Faith Malton:
Oh, that's so comforting, thank you for sharing. Well, as a young girl and having one arm, I knew going into dance club that it was not going to be fun because I didn't have any boyfriends, friends that are males. And then I could already anticipate the kinds of situations that it was going to be put in, but I was determined to still be a cool girl and go with all my friends, not be the one that didn't go. And so having a preview [inaudible 00:27:13] boy, whose first time it is to learn how to dance, and whose first time it is to possibly dance with a girl, and first time meeting somebody with one arm. Having them... I mean, it was worse than a deer in headlights. A deer in headlights with ice skates on its feet, on a block of ice, the deer can't run. It can't move and is frozen that.

Faith Malton:
And so, I even remember having to show a guy where to touch me, because he didn't want to offend... And that's one of the things that have sort of become a bit excessive and always understanding where the other person is coming from and having compassion for them, to the point where I will dismiss my own needs in a situation because I want to make sure the other person is comfortable. I want to make sure the other person feels seen, feels heard and feels loved. And so, in that interaction the dance class has started and I'm not going to be the one standing there, so I'm having to like hold space and support this boy and show him what to do and put on a happy face and make it work.

Faith Malton:
Meanwhile, on the inside I'm absolutely dying, but I'm going to make sure that this boy has a nice time because I don't want to not. So it was incredibly traumatic because what it did was I had to stuff my own experience inside myself to survive that moment. And then it was even more heartbreaking because my mom would pick me up and I would have tears in my eyes and she'd be like, how'd it go? And I would share with her. And what was worse for me was telling somebody like my mother my experience, and having her have no way to relate to me other than just to give me a hug and say it's going to be okay. But because she couldn't relate, I didn't feel seen. And so I just decided it was worse to tell somebody your experience and them not be able to see or recognize you, than it is for me to just keep my experience to myself. So then we start stuffing our emotions.

Dave:
Yeah. And Faith, you started off before we went live with our conversation here, talking a little bit about something you were working on, even just recently that is a little bit about unpacking those things, in No Barrier's term we'd say those are the big, heavy rocks in your rock sacks that have been holding you down forever. So tell our listeners a little bit about the strategies that you have explored or are currently using to kind of let some of that stuff that you've carried with you out.

Faith Malton:
Yeah. I love your podcast, I don't know barriers. Because the biggest barriers that we place against ourselves are the ones that are in our minds. And oftentimes we don't even realize we have those barriers, but fortunately life is benevolent. And I believe this gentleman that I follow quite extensively, his name is Peter Crown, and he says, life will constantly reveal to you people in circumstances to reveal what you're not free. And so some of the exercises that I've been doing to peel back the layers of the onion that I am and release the freedom within me is, one is doing rage releases, which is why my voice sounds quite sultry, it's because I have been roaring like a lion, bringing in lion energy, one to release anger, to release very intense emotions. And two, also roaring is incredibly empowering as far as refilling the cup of personal empowerment. So whenever I roar, I visualize bringing back in all of my own energy that I have once given away to other people. And so that's one of things I practice.

Faith Malton:
Another practice of mine is doing breath work, doing the sudarshan chakra karya, which is a Kundalini yoga practice where you say a mantra and you have breath work. Breathwork is extremely powerful for moving energy through the body, and so is putting your body under stress. So working out, lifting weights, and doing different optimization methods such as contrast therapy, where you go into an ice bath and then you go into a sauna and doing iterations of that.

Erik Weihenmayer:
And that's all with that idea that trauma works its way into the body. It's not just something you have to fight through with your mind, you actually have to release that energy from your body in some way. Right?

Faith Malton:
Exactly. And it really is resetting the nervous system. That's one of the things that's really important when it comes to doing this work. And then also another important thing is whenever you are working on releasing energy, is thinking of emotion as energy and motion. So if you don't let that energy be in motion, meaning you don't allow yourself to feel your emotions and move it through the body, then that energy gets stored. It has to go somewhere.

Dave:
Faith, I'm curious. We've talked a lot about kind of your growing up and a lot about kind of the journey you've been on for your own healing and processing and growth. Just tell our listeners what you're up to now. You're an adult now and you've got your college degree. So what are you doing now?

Faith Malton:
Now I'm working at a civil engineering firm here in Houston, Texas, called Walter P. Moore. I'm working as a graduate engineer in what's called site design, so I pretty much do all the... My responsibility is to make sure that a site drains, so it doesn't flood, and then it has utility service like sanitary, water, storm, things like that. And then in the evenings I'm working on creating some sort of either organization or business that's about helping people transform their mindset from victimhood to creatorship. And that involves optimizing the human being on all the different dimensions that we operate in such as mind, body, spirit, the emotional plan with the spiritual plan, et cetera.

Dave:
So explain that idea, from victimhood to creatorship. Give us kind of the walkthrough, what does that mean?

Faith Malton:
Well, it sounds a lot like what you guys do as far as helping people. What's the story and what are the facts? What are the physics that happened in your life? And then what was this objective narrative that you overlaid onto those physics? Because, again, the stories that we tell ourselves shape and mold the reality that we live in, and oftentimes we don't realize that the problems that we have are stemmed from stories that we're telling ourselves, that we don't actually have any problems, there's just stories.

Dave:
Yeah. If we were interested in engaging with that work that you're getting started, is there a place we can go to learn more or not quite yet?

Faith Malton:
Not quite yet, I'm still working on creating a website. However, the best place to reach me is through my Instagram, which is theonearmwonderrr, And the R at the end of wonder has three Rs because I have three limbs. And then you can email me. And also on my YouTube channel, I believe I dropped a comment on some of the videos that has my email address that you can contact me via that way as well.

Dave:
Awesome.

Erik Weihenmayer:
And I know we've gotten all deep on this, but if you want to learn how to put on a pair of jeans with one arm, pretty cool.

Dave:
Yeah. Yeah. There's a lot of practical advice, a lot of spiritual-

Erik Weihenmayer:
It's not a philosophy.

Dave:
Yeah. Yeah. But I mean, I think for us at No Barrier, certainly the philosophy is a big part of how you move through the challenge and the struggle and doing that difficult work to dive deep into what's holding you back and where it stems from. That's a big part of how we help people through their challenges. So, Faith it has been a wonderful conversation. Thank you so much for spending time with us.

Faith Malton:
Thank you guys so much for having me. These conversations, they fill up my cup, they light me up, and so thank you for giving me the opportunity to light my candle.

Dave:
Ooh, nice. Yeah.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Lighting mine over here in golden too.

Dave:
Yeah. And as always listeners, you can find our show notes on our website, nobarrierspodcast.org. You can also find any of the references to channels where you can follow Faith and learn more, we'll provide the links in our show notes. If you enjoyed this conversation, the best thing you can do is share it with one other person. Our podcast listenership is always growing and it's growing mostly because people enjoy the conversations and are sharing it with someone they love and trust who may need to hear some of this amazing information that's being shared by our incredible guests. So thank you so much to our listeners. Thank you Faith, thanks Erik.

Faith Malton:
Thank you guys.

Erik Weihenmayer:
Awesome. Thanks Dave, Faith. No barriers to everyone.

Faith Malton:
Absolutely.

Speaker 5:
We would like to thank our generous sponsors that make our No Barriers podcast possible, Wells Fargo, Prudential, CoBank, ERO electronics and Winnebago. Thank you so much for your support, it means everything to us. The production team behind this podcast includes Senior Producer, Pauline Schaffer, sound, design, editing, and mixing by Tyler Cotman, and marketing support by Heathers or colleagues, Stevie Donardo, Erica Huey and Alex Schaffer. Special thanks to the Dan Ryan band for our intro song guidance. And thanks to all of you for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast, we encourage you to subscribe to it, share it and give us a review. Show notes can be found at nobarrierspodcast.com.

 



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